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June 26, 2008

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Posted by Stewart Weltman: “Today it is tougher than ever for young aspiring litigators to get hands on in court [Read More]

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Document Retention

i just went for the first time last week and it was a pretty cool experience. im sure it gets even more exciting and intense with bigger cases. good advice!
-Jessica

Elliott

In Florida, some civil firms have "loaned" their attorneys to the local prosecutors office. Both sides benefit: The attorneys get to pick juries, examine witnesses, etc., and the prosecutors office gets some extra hands on deck during a lean budget period. If you're looking for trial experience, you should check with your local prosecutor's or public defender's office to see if they'd be interested in a similar arrangement.

Best wishes,
-Elliott

Elliott Wilcox
http://www.TrialTheater.com

JP

Do you think it's a good idea for a young lawyer to work at a prosecutor's office or public defender's officer where they, presumably, will be able to get more trial experience than anywhere else in the first few years of their careers? Is this a good idea even if the person intends to eventually become a civil litigator? One of the big downsides to this route is that there are some significant differences between civil litigation and criminal litigation (for example, depositions) and, as such, while the young lawyer may get some experience trying cases (or generally being in a courtroom), he will be undeveloped in skills that may prove more valuable for the modern-day civil litigator.

Publius Novus

"Those who have trial experience are going to be a rare breed and under the law of supply and demand, those of you who want to have a leg up on your competition should get thee to a courtroom." Ah, Mr. Weltman, if only it were so. I have over 32 years of quality courtroom experience (DOJ civil trial & and state OAG). I have tried everything from $3k administrative cases to a $200mm+ jury case (win) to class actions to sophisticated criminal cases. No firm is interested because I have no portfolio and they did not train me. So much for experience.

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